Often I stand with a client at the completion of a project and lament that we are the only

ones who can fully appreciate the success of the remodeling. Its because only the owners

and their architect really knew the original house and how the new construction has altered it.

 

Here I attempt to document some of the changes I've wrought.

before & after.  

after

before

By relocating the closet we reworked a

tight hallway into an entry foyer with a

more formal stairway. 

A laundry connected the garage to the kitchen with a small double hung window facing the street. Replacing the laundry with a mudroom and secondary entrance provides an inviting and attractive exterior while providing functionality on the interior. 

before

after

after

The project included remodeling the kitchen and mudroom. However I suggested the owner add the gable roof over the flat roof at the second floor to better integrate the exisitng wing with the rest of the house. The result is a much more cohesive sum of the parts.

before

before

This fifties ranch style home sits on the bank of an inlet of

Long Island Sound  on Shelter Island. The design achieves a

much larger house without resorting to a tear-down and a new "McMansion". With the exception of a vestibule addition, the new house sits on the existing foundation. The new house uses steeper gable roofs to gain interior space yet keep the new structure within a similar scale to the original house and the surrounding neighborhood.

after

before

before

Residence Westport, Ct.

The original 70s family room included a stark brick fireplace. By plastering the brick and adding a mantel the remodeling made the room feel larger and much lighter. The custom mantel includes hand made tiles purchased by the owners, inset into the panels.

after

before

after

 

Residence Brookline, Ma.

This split level is completely renewed by moving

the entry to grade, extending the bay two stories

and extending a roof across the first floor to bury

the cantilever over the garage and strengthen the

horizontal lines of the original house. 

after

before

A full bath had been added in the original stair well. By removing the tub and creating a much smaller powder room we were able to open up the stairway to the hall, as it had been when the house was built.

 

The newel post and handrail are salvaged pieces from a yard in New Hampshire. The railing system is patterned after the original railing at the second floor. 

 

after

before

This facade of this 1890s Queen Anne home was restored and renewed with new trim, siding and windows.  The open side porch was screened and an addition was built over the side porch for a master bathroom.

before

after

This house had all its trim stripped from it when it

was clad in vinyl siding. They also stripped the cornice from the corner bay, laving the top

of the bay rather naked. When adding a second story to the 

bay we trimmed it in a high Victorian style.

 

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